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Most people lie to gain an advantage or to protect themselves from embarrassment, social reprimands, or even prison. During my 25 years as a police officer and Special Agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), I witnessed countless lies told for a variety of reasons in every imaginable circumstance from petty criminals to sophisticated international spies, each with differing levels of ability to lie convincingly. 

Psychological Narrative Analysis (PNA) is a professional method to detect deception in both written and oral communications. PNA is a new technique based on scientific research. PNA does not require colored pencils, boxes, or circles to detect deception. PNA is a passive technique that "pings" interviewers when deception is detected. PNA is an innovative technique to detect deception in both social and professional environments.

People with sensitive social and professional boundaries can use PNA techniques to interview people without the outward appearance of force or pressure.

Criminal investigators can use PNA to uncover the truth during interviews and interrogations.

Lawyers can use PNA to isolate where clients, defendants, or witnesses withhold information in statements, depositions, or court testimony.

Parents can use PNA to prompt their children to provide information that they would not otherwise readily share.

Human resource personnel can use PNA to determine the sincerity and trustworthiness of job applicants.

Psychologists can use PNA to reveal subtle personality traits and unconscious behavioral motivations of their clients. In short, anybody who wants to gain insights into the behavioral characteristics of others and to test their veracity can benefit from PNA.

Among those who have benefited from Psychological Narrative Analysis training are the: FBI, ICE, DEA, DIA, Secret Service, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, the American Polygraph Association, Office of Bar Investigators, and numerous other agencies.


Fibs to Facts
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Featured article, "Secrets of Special Agents" in the January 2011 issue of Psychology Today.

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